reginahellinger.com

It's always a good idea to have a master of ceremonies, because they can keep it all in order.

A Rule to Consider

reginahellinger.com A welcome by the master of ceremonies, who introduces a friend of the family or close friend of the couple, who makes a speech leading up to a toast to the bride and groom, followed by a speech in reply by the groom, or bride, or both, who thank everyone who has helped organise the wedding, usually ending with a toast to the bridesmaids, who have toasts made on their behalf by the best man who then makes a toast to the hosts - who might or might not be the bride's mother or father or both, who reply.
But you don't have to do any of that. It's all a question of saying the things that matter to you, and having the people who matter to you involved. Choose the people who you would like to say something, decide who should be recognised and thanked, and then work out an order that suits you best.
It's always a good idea to have a master of ceremonies, because they can keep it all in order, and you really should have someone to introduce all the speakers. But apart from that, choose what seems right for you.
One of the ways you can make it particularly interesting is to make some unconventional toasts. For example, each speaker could choose a year that they think is particularly appropriate to toast. (For example "1976, because that was the year that..."). By taking this approach, you give people the chance to think about things in an original way, and have more of a chance of steering away from making speeches that recite all the usual platitudes.

hot keywords and useful links